Affecting Small Fruit

Aphids
Aphid
Description:
Pear-shaped, soft bodied insects; can we winged or wingless. Most commonly green but can be black, dark brown, yellow, white, bronze, red or pink.

 

Damage:
Suck sap while feeding on leaves, stems or roots. Can be found on growing tips, undersides of leaves, along stems and in roots.

 

Signs
Reduction in plant vigour; wilting and distortion of plant tissue - curled, puckered or distorted growth. Excrete honeydew, a sticky fluid that can lead to sooty mold development and also attracts ants, wasps and other flies. In some cases can cause red blistering on leaves.

 

What it attacks
Most fruit trees

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Caterpillar
Caterpillar
Description:
Elongated, worm-like insect with a segmented body, comes in a variety of colours, striping, speckling. Types of caterpillars loopers, cankerworms, leafrollers, hornworms, inchworms, fall webworm, larvae of moths and butterflies.

 

Damage:
Caterpillars chew irregular holes in foliage of plants.

 

Signs
Severe cases may cause defoliation. Decrease in plant vigour.

 

What it attacks
All ornamentals, vegetables, fruit.

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Currant Fruit Flies
Description:
Legless white larvae; adult is a small yellowish fly with a dark band on the wings,

 

Damage:
Adult flies lay eggs in developing fruit; larvae feed in the fruit causing it to become inedible and drop prematurely.

 

Signs
Worms can be found in fruit, rendering fruit inedible. Fruit turns red and drops prematurely.

 

What it attacks
Currant, gooseberry, Saskatoon

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Imported Currantworm
Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org
Description:
Young larvae are pale green with black head and spots; mature larvae are pale green with a yellow head; adults sawflies are black with pale yellow stripes on the abdomen.

 

Damage:
Currantworms feed on leaves, these voracious feeders can defoliate plants.

 

Signs
Leaves will have holes or show signs of feeding; plants may have no leaves. Decreases plant vigour.

 

What it attacks
Currants and gooseberry.

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Leaf Roller
Leaf Roller
Description:
Green caterpillar with a brown head chews.

 

Damage:
Irregular holes in leaves, chews on blues, flowers and fruit rolls itself up in the leaf - essentially making a shelter to feed and grow.

 

Signs
Cause decline in vigour, distortion of growth and fruit.

 

What it attacks:
Most fruit

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Raspberry Crown Borer
University of Georgia Plant Pathology Archive, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Description:
White grub-like worm with a dark head; adults are black with yellow banding - look similar to a yellow jacket.

 

Damage:
Larvae burrow and tunnel into the base of the canes causing a swelling (gall) at or just below the surface of the soil.

 

Signs
Watch for weak stems, check base of canes for signs of boring there might be some sawdust around the base of the plant. Wilting leaves or the presence of a gall at or just below the soil surface. Reduced vigour of plants.

 

What it attacks:
Raspberry

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Raspberry Fruitworm
Description:
Adults are tiny brown beetles; larvae are small yellowish worms

 

Damage:
Adult beetles feed on new growth, damaging leaves, buds and flowers. Adult females lay eggs in developing fruit; larvae feed in the fruit causing it to become inedible and can potentially reduce crop yield.

 

Signs
Worms can be found in fruit, rendering fruit inedible. Cause reduced yields.

 

What it attacks:
Raspberry

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Slugs
Slugs
Description:
Slimy black-brown speckled mollusks chew large irregular holes in leaves and gouging holes in ripe and unripe fruit.

 

Damage:
Irregular holes with smooth edges are chewed in leaves.

 

Signs
Slimy and/or shiny trails left behind by slugs.

 

What it attacks:
Ornamentals and fruit

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Spider mites
Spider mites
Description:
Tiny rounded eight-legged insect.

 

Damage:
Puncture leaf and suck out both water and food producing green chlorophyll.

 

Signs
Leaves become speckled with yellow blotches; stippling and dotting on leaves; leaves may fall prematurely; fine webbing on leaves, in leaf crotches or on flower buds; reduces vigour.

 

What it attacks:
All ornamentals

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Strawberry Root Weevil
Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org
Description:
White legless grub with a brown head; adults are dark brown to black with a snout.

 

Damage:
Larvae feed on the roots and crowns of plants. Adults feed on leaf and fruit of strawberries, weeds and grasses.

 

Signs
Stunted and distorted growth, notched leaf margins. Severe infestations can result in death.

 

What it attacks:
Strawberry, blueberry, raspberry

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